PhotographybyAbi

23 Jan 2007 1,187 views
 
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photoblog image Death Cell--- Elmina Castle

Death Cell--- Elmina Castle

Still on the series on Africa... this is an inside view of what was deemed the "DEATH CELL".

Here, mankind's ultimate inhumanity became etched on the faces of others and stamped on each stony wall. Welcome to Elmina Castle.


I truly didnot feel that any editting was necessary, It was a dark part of Human history which should be preserve that way.

                                                                         History

Perched on the rocky fringes of the beach in Elmina town, 12 km from Cape Coast, the castle was  built in 1482 as a trading post. Local history says the quest for more gold and ivory, as well as the spread of Christianity, inspired Don Diego D'Azambuja, a Portuguese explorer, to lead more than 200 soldiers and masons to build the castle. It was then christened St George's Castle.

Here, the Portuguese felt safe from any external or local aggression. Then, as the old years peeled away to reveal a newer one, the lure of gold paled away into insignificance while the prospect of capturing stronger Africans to work the fields in the Americas became more exhilarating.

Along with this prospect were bigger profits. Gradually, St George's Castle metamorphosed into Elmina Castle.
The cells that once held bars of gold became dungeons for humans. And days and nights overlapped in an endless cycle of pain and torture.

The slaves that were deemed trouble makers at Elmina slave castle were put into this horrible cell with the skull and crossbones over the entrance, never to come out alive again. They were given no food or water and died in the cell and were left there for a period of time. When new comers came they had to share the cell with the corpses for an undetermined period of time.

The Cell had no windos for ventilation except for the small hollow holes in the door, so you can imagine how hot the room will get. ( The holes in the doors was a lot smaller 500 years ago).

 

you can also check out Etomi's & Christian Photographs from the same castle series also..

http://etomi.shutterchance.com/photoblog/9028.htm

http://ghana.shutterchance.com/photoblog/50235.htm

Death Cell--- Elmina Castle

Still on the series on Africa... this is an inside view of what was deemed the "DEATH CELL".

Here, mankind's ultimate inhumanity became etched on the faces of others and stamped on each stony wall. Welcome to Elmina Castle.


I truly didnot feel that any editting was necessary, It was a dark part of Human history which should be preserve that way.

                                                                         History

Perched on the rocky fringes of the beach in Elmina town, 12 km from Cape Coast, the castle was  built in 1482 as a trading post. Local history says the quest for more gold and ivory, as well as the spread of Christianity, inspired Don Diego D'Azambuja, a Portuguese explorer, to lead more than 200 soldiers and masons to build the castle. It was then christened St George's Castle.

Here, the Portuguese felt safe from any external or local aggression. Then, as the old years peeled away to reveal a newer one, the lure of gold paled away into insignificance while the prospect of capturing stronger Africans to work the fields in the Americas became more exhilarating.

Along with this prospect were bigger profits. Gradually, St George's Castle metamorphosed into Elmina Castle.
The cells that once held bars of gold became dungeons for humans. And days and nights overlapped in an endless cycle of pain and torture.

The slaves that were deemed trouble makers at Elmina slave castle were put into this horrible cell with the skull and crossbones over the entrance, never to come out alive again. They were given no food or water and died in the cell and were left there for a period of time. When new comers came they had to share the cell with the corpses for an undetermined period of time.

The Cell had no windos for ventilation except for the small hollow holes in the door, so you can imagine how hot the room will get. ( The holes in the doors was a lot smaller 500 years ago).

 

you can also check out Etomi's & Christian Photographs from the same castle series also..

http://etomi.shutterchance.com/photoblog/9028.htm

http://ghana.shutterchance.com/photoblog/50235.htm

comments (6)

  • Martin
  • United States
  • 23 Jan 2007, 04:29
The shot matches the history very well. Thanks for sharing this. The true horror of these events is always in the details, which the history books typically gloss over.
great falling light
the light can be alot better.Its too bright for a death cell in my opinion. I think pictures on death,despair and evil should be dark.
Photography by Abi: image open to intepretation, I agree with you in principle....but what does the Light represent...... That is the beauty of how light is perceive...when you talk to people of different walks of life some will tell you that Darkness represents purity and Holiness
  • Fola77
  • 23 Jan 2007, 14:05
hey, niiiiice shot!

Where were you last night? 'the commemmoration of the abolition of slavery' debate was held at ULU, and I kept expecting you to 'walk in' Kofi Klu said spoke some depressing truths about Elmina castle...

well done
tendai mwari ;-)
Photography by Abi: keep me posted....on any future lectures please
It really feels like death, imagine being trapped in there. I think the lighting is perfect especially cos i can see the wall and the holes in the floor.
  • Ayo
  • Lagos, Nigeria
  • 19 Feb 2007, 00:08
Great image. I have actually been to Elmina Castle myself and saw for myself the evidence of our recent past of man's injustice to man. I was for one of the very few times in my life sober when i was shown round the castle. After four years i can actually still remember vividly the odour in the room where the female slaves where keep. Wouldnt mind u posting images of the chapel right at the centre of the castle. That really brings to light the shameless and pretentious nature of the pepetrator of the slave trade.
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